Sunday, November 22, 2009

O'Connor Going Prep

3/25/10
Kevin O'Connor, the 6'6" junior forward from Stevens High, is transferring to the St. Paul's School. O'Connor will be reclassifying and joining the Class of 2012. This is a big loss for Stevens, who will have a tough season next year in Division III. But for O'Connor it is a good move to reclassify, and challenge himself in academics and in basketball. St. Paul's is a very good academic school. Search them on wikipedia and look at their list of alumni...very impressive stuff! Good luck to Kevin in the future.

On a side note, this is the second consecutive year that Stevens High has lost a top hoops prospect to prep school. Last summer, 6'10" Kaleb Tarczewski transferred to St. Mark's School in Mass. If both players stayed at Stevens, they would have been the favorites to win Division III in 2011. The 6'6" O'Connor and 6'10" Tarczewski would have both been seniors next year and would have been a dominant inside 1-2 punch.

39 comments:

  1. Kevin is a great kid. I heard he will be playing AAU this summer for the Jayhawks.

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  2. He is on the Jayhawks. A great pick up for them. Who else is looking at prep Jeremy? I've heard through the rumor mill that Madol, Green, O'Loughlin, Holder and Spirou are all looking around? Any thoughts?

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  3. From what I've heard the Milford "Big 3" are staying. They might be doing a post-grad year, but I'm pretty sure they want to come back and make it two in a row. The other 3 though could definitely be on the move. I'd rather not comment further until we know for sure what these guys are doing.

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  4. Jeremy, have you been to a Rivals or Jayhawks pratice yet? Would really like to hear where all the kids are playing. Also, are you going to get Dunham and Hazleton back on WGAM his summer?? That was a great segment and very insightful to what both programs are all about.

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  5. I've seen a couple of Rivals workouts, and will be likely be checking out a Jayhawks practice next week. And the show that Dunham and Hazelton were on last year was Pete Tarrier's show on WGAM, so it's up to him if he has them on again, when it would be, etc. But I will talk to Pete and see if he'd like to have them on again. I agree it was a very good segment.

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  6. my boy kevs gonna tear it up, hopefully he moves too a shooting forward posistion at st. pauls. kaleb kevin and belive jermey matos got into vermont acedmey? he was suspended the season for offcourt issue but the V.A. coach liked him more than kevin. stevens only has one good kid left lol

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  7. Who has been impressive at the rival's workouts?

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  8. Vonleh, Mussachia and Auguste have been impressive at the Rivals workouts. As for NH kids, Gilligan has really been taking the ball strong to the rim and LaRoche has been flying to the basket.

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  9. Good for Kevin for going to a great academic instituion like St. Pauls but if he's looking to improve his basketball opportunities hes heading to the wrong place. St. Pauls is not by far a respectable program!!

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  10. I agree...i would've thought he'd be more apt to go to Proctor or Tilton...St.Paul's will do nothing to improve his game...we serve him well academically though...

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  11. Go to the jayhawks Tuesday everyone should be there

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  12. Not everyone will be there on Tuesday night because BG is having it's basketball banquet that night. If you want to see everyone, go on either Monday or Wednesday night.

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  13. I'm surprised none of the milford kids are going prep. More exposure than staying in
    div II. Playing with the top prospects at a prep would help their chances for D1 or 2. Maybe grades are an issue, i don't know, none made the academic allstate.

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  14. We arnt going to the banquet so tues would be fine or wednesday

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  15. New Hampshire-based kids need to be very realistic about their college potential. The three Milford kids are very successful playing at a Division 2 level in the small town of Milford, but there is a long way to go before we can start talking about them as D1 or D2 players. There are literally 40-50 players playing RIGHT NOW at prep schools in New England that have a better shot at D1 or D2, based on size alone. And that's just New England preps, not to mention the rest of the public school players in the Northeast region. How many D1 or D2 scholarships open up every year? 100? 150? Think of the odds.

    So, yes, maybe going prep would be a good idea, but probably only for O'laughlin or Holder. Mitchell is a good little player at the NH level but I see him ending up at a lower level D3 school, like a Rivier or Daniel Webster, just based on his 5'6 stature. No need to spend 40k on a prep year if you're going to end up at one of those schools.

    O'laughlin has the best college-ready body of the three right now, and I think if he continues to improve might be able to make it at the D2 level, but probably more likely will be a solid D3 player. Don't think D1 is in the cards, unless he grows 2-3 more inches.

    Holder has the most upside, based on his athleticism. His frame really needs to fill out in the next 1-2 years, and he needs to be more consistent from the outside. Again, probably a solid D3 player but based on upside, may get some D2 interest.

    So, the parents of these kids need to decide if they want to spend the money for prep school, given that none of them are a lock for D1 or D2 college ball. If they can get some kind of financial assistance, then I say go for it, give them a PG year and see how things play out. An extra year of ball never hurt anyone.

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  16. With all the dough they've dish out for aau, why not prep ? better schools and players. would still help them for d2 and 3.

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  17. 11:39-
    Great post the only thing I would add that their are no players right now that are scholarship players. The closest would be Madol & Green. They are both potential D2 scholarship players at best.
    Madol has a huge upside & keeps getting better Green is the opposite. He has the most talent in the state, but he doesn't work as hard. If he gets his act together he could be very good...

    I remeber the not too distant past when players like Chris Burns and Pat Lupkowski were in high school. They were much better players than anyone currently in NH and they didn't get scholarhips immediately out of high school.

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  18. 11:39- I respect your opinion, but i still think these kids should at least try and see how good they are compared to kids their own age. I know they do aau but that is a game here a game there. why not play day in and day out against some of the best. they are "the big fish in a little bowl" they should at least try. can someone that is close to them comment ?

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  19. Kevin, Mike and everyone else. The future is now. you will never experience anything as rewarding as representing your community. Enjoy the moment and don't worry about D1 D2 or D3

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  20. 6:44, I think alot of it is financially-based. The typical prep school costs $42,000 per year. Most hoop players that transfer to a prep school reclassify and repeat a year, usually their junior year. So that's about $80,000 right there, just to have your kid play two years at a prep and hopefully have a shot at a D1 or D2 scholarship. So what if the scholarship doesn't happen, and the kid ends up playing at a D3 school? Most good D3 academic schools cost $50,000 per year. So if you send your kid to prep and they end up going D3, that's $280,000 for the 2 years of prep and 4 years of college. Big gamble.

    Now if you can get alot of financial aid to go prep, then it might be a no brainer. Your son will definitely improve as a basketball player, versus staying in NH. They will be practicing year-round vs. much better players, and will be in a college-type environment in terms of weight training, conditioning, etc. Plus the academics are stronger and will enhance their college admissions potential. All good reasons to consider prep, for the right child.

    However, there is also the personal side to the decision. Not every parent wants their teenager to go away to a boarding school, where they will hardly ever see them. I personally would have a problem with that - kids grow up so fast and you want to have them around as much as possible before they hit 18 years old. And not every kid wants to go to boarding school, and leave all their friends.

    For certain NH kids, like Jordan Laguerre or Kaleb Tarzewski, for example, I think prep is a no brainer. But for some of the current crop of NH players, including the Milford kids, who are on the borderline of being D2 vs. D3 players, the factors mentioned above have to be considered.

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  21. nh players like gilligan and laroche will become so much more hard nosed once they make it through the rivals aau season. you play every single second with that program or they sit you down. gilligan along with willimas another rival had huge games at last weekends all-star games.

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  22. Looking at the stats cited for last weekends game, it does sound like Williams and Gilligan scored lots of points, however it sounds like no one was playing any defense, so scoring alot isn't difficult in that situation. How impressive was that to any college coach watching? No wonder everyone keeps blogging about NH players not making it past D3. People think its ONLY about how much you score. Offense is only HALF the game...understand that people! Players who can score are a dime a dozen. Players that can score and play solid defense are the ones in demand.

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  23. I think with Gilligan, his biggest obstacle seems to be himself. If he can learn how to be mentally tough and not the poor-sport he's showed everyone, then maybe he has a chance to be a great player. Leading the league in throwing your mouthpiece will get him no-where. Souhegan could have a good team this year and he is the key piece in the puzzle.

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  24. I guess I will grab the post for the Mitchell family. Mike is young and will most likely go a year of Prep School as a post grad. His mother and I talked to him about reclassifying and he does not want to leave now and likes being the big fish in the little bowl in NH. He could use a year of maturity and academics at a prep school but for now he will do his senior year at Milford. If the right opportunity came his way for d3 even he would probably go right into college but it would depend on the school and his maturation process over the next year and a half. We realize that he is up agains the size thing but also would be glad to pay the extra money for the academic stability and training he would get at a prep school. The family is also planning on leaving the area soon and returning to the Midwest or somewhere south so Mike will be applying and looking into other options as well.

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  25. There are a little more than 300 D1 schools each with 3-4 available scholarships per year on average, which means 900-1200 per season.

    Check out NERR and look to see where the top ranked kids in NH are going... You will see a significant drop off after 14-15. I don't want to say that some of the kids ranked lower than that don't have a chance, because colleges miss out on kids.

    The most successful kids are the kids that choose to go to a school that they will play at, not just be part of a team. If a kid LOVES the game they will go somewhere to play. If that is a low D1, D2, or even D3 so be it. What they will gain from that experience is a lifetime of friendships, contacts, and memories... Lets face it, the good majority of these kids won't make money playing the sport, but they can always be involved. Kids need to learn to use the game of basketball as a vehicle, not let the game of basketball use them.

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  26. When will you be updating on this site...player and team rankings?

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  27. ihope we all are remembering that the purpose of PREP SCHOOL is to PREPARE! Prepare them for life, not just basketball. If a player is going to graduate and he is in the bottom of his class AGE WISE and he wants to go to prep school WHY NOT?? If he is border D3/D2 , D2/D1 it doesnt not matter. He will grow as a player and as person in that year.

    We have to stop labeling the success these kids are having by the name recognition of the college they attend! The fact that they may not earn a scholarship means nothing. Does a kid going to a D3 school like Williams College, Amherst College, or Brandeis for free bc of a year at prep school mean less then a kid going to Providence, SNHU, Bentley? Not every kid wants to go play at the HIGHEST level! Some want to get a great education (for free or next to it) and play basketball at a HIGH level. So would the tuition at a prep school for a year be worth the free education at a college? ABSOLUTELY!

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  28. Great post 9:59 and if you go to prep school,get more prepared for college and go on to earn a degree and get prepared for life after school in the process all is well. This is simple, you have the money to spend and want to insure that you are giving you kid the best chance to succeed at the next level then it is well worth the time and money. Not for everyone but for those who can work it out can be a win win situation.

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  29. You sound like one of those parents that don't want johnny to fail in life. Lets be real here if the kid gets into UCLA or Hesser college it is what it is don't think that your kid who grew up playing a sport or sports will not know the difference between the both. Every kid wants to be the best and play at the highest level i guarantee that. So will they be able to? No the answer is just plain no and your kid knows that so lets try to give these kids some credit and stop acting like its not ok to fail.

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  30. How intimate do you know these families 6:34 am? The parents are in the best position to make decisions for their kids - not you. No one knows what anyone ultimatly will accomplish or achieve in life. If the parents have the financial means and the desire to give their kids a Prep school education - because in their opinion it is the right/best option for their child -then who are you to criticize? How does sending someone to Prep mean that a parent doesn't believe that its not okay to fail? I don't see the connection. Life isn't fair. Some people have more advantages/opportunites than others. It is what it is.

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  31. If you look at the recruiting reports for the top players in each of the NE states, you will see that all of them (with the exception of a few)that have signed D1 are coming from a prep school. It seems to me that this is the path that must be taken for a D1 ride unless you are a top 50 type of player straight out of HS which no one in New Hampshire is.

    Also, there is a lot of talk about a scholarship (even at the lower levels of play) being worth $200,000 or so which is for the most part true. But what does 4-5 years of AAU elite travel ball cost? A year of prep school? The travel for family to see the games? Not to mention the time and energy spent. So the scholarship package cost a lot to get...and not all of the families that pay that cost get scholarships out of it. The whole thing can be a gamble.

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  32. well not all kids that go to prep school have to pay for it. they can be given a lot of financial aid if they qualify.

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  33. I heard Kevin O'Connor is playing AAU for the NY Juice. Can anyone confirm this?

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  34. Kevin is playing with the Jayhawks.

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  35. SORRY GUYS-a scholarship does not mean a "free" college education. Check out how much work is involved in playing high major and getting the education. Many programs want the kids to take basket weaving 101 so as not to interfere with basketball.

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  36. Kevin O'Connor is playing for the jayhawks, he was never approached by the Vermont Academy coach. And for all those who mentioned the money piece, money will not be an issue for Kevin.

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  37. For some the idea of prep school comes down to one thing, the ability to play basketball in college. Some prep schools are only minor leagues for the college programs. I would think if a D-1 or 2 school is interested in you as a player and they suggest going to prep school, you should do it. You have to remember in the long run for these kids it should be more about education then basketball.
    Those 2 kids from Stevens would have gotten noticed if they stayed at Stevens but both left for different reasons. Kaleb left purely for basketball reasons and Kevin is leaving for academic reasons. St. Marks is a basketball powerhouse where St. Pauls is a academic powerhouse and its the education at both of these places that will stay with hese young men the longest.
    I appauled these young men for making this very tough decision and leaving there frinds and family, prep schoo is not right for everyone , but its the right thing for these 2.

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  38. The rumor of kevin going to prep school has been out there since the end of last year, right after his teammate left. I would assume that was the reason for him not being approached by that Vermont school. An extra year of High school and AAU will only help his chances not to mention the superior education he will receive. He will undoubtedly go to a good college whether its for basketball or not.
    For those that go to prep school solely for basketball and the chances of a full ride..what happens if they don't get it ? Don't let basketball be the only reason you attend a prep school.

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  39. There are a little more than 300 D1 schools each with 3-4 available scholarships per year on average, which means 900-1200 per season.

    Check out NERR and look to see where the top ranked kids in NH are going... You will see a significant drop off after 14-15. I don't want to say that some of the kids ranked lower than that don't have a chance, because colleges miss out on kids.

    The most successful kids are the kids that choose to go to a school that they will play at, not just be part of a team. If a kid LOVES the game they will go somewhere to play. If that is a low D1, D2, or even D3 so be it. What they will gain from that experience is a lifetime of friendships, contacts, and memories... Lets face it, the good majority of these kids won't make money playing the sport, but they can always be involved. Kids need to learn to use the game of basketball as a vehicle, not let the game of basketball use them.

    Monday, March 29, 2010 11:32:00 AM EDT

    I know a couple of kids that are getting serious looks from d2 schools already as juniors one of them is Holder he has ST A's, SNHU and Stonehill all seriously interested in him in fact he put on his face book that he was just invited for a tour last weekend to stonehill before the hoop mountain tournament. So i guess there goes your theory about some of these kids in NH not making it.

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