Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Stevens High Names New Basketball Coach

Last week Stevens High School in Claremont hired Scott MacNamee as its new boys varsity basketball coach.

MacNamee replaces the team's previous coach, Bill McIver. He has been the Lebanon boys reserve coach for the past couple of years. He also played for Lebanon when he was in high school.

MacNamee has a tough road ahead. This spring Stevens lost their best player to the prep school ranks, when 6'6" forward Kevin O'Connor decided to transfer to the St. Paul's School. Not only that, but last summer the school lost its other star player, 7'0" center Kaleb Tarczewski. He left Stevens for the St. Mark's School, and he now has a scholarship offer from Kansas.

If both O'Connor and Tarczewski stayed at Stevens, they would both be seniors this upcoming season and the Cardinals would be the favorites to win Division III. It would have been the scariest 1-2 inside duo NH has seen in quite some time.

McNamee's task will be to make Stevens a contender in Division III. Without the two star big men who have left the program, that will be a tall order (oh yes folks, that pun WAS intended!)

83 comments:

  1. Congratulations Coach MacNamee!

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  2. Coach Mac was a great High School Player. A captain of a state championship team He also player at St. Lawrence University on the Basketball and National Champion Soccer team.

    A young guy who is a proven winner

    Good move Stevens

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  3. He has played at the college level. Maybe you shouldn't rip people you don't know.

    Since so few people move on to the college level you would never have enough coaches.

    Bill Bellicek never played in the NFL, probably should get rid of him. Clearly Red Auerbach must have been a joke. Let's see, how about that clown Butler hired he was just a kid, what were they thinking?

    I want to give 9:28 the benefit of the doubt here, is that really what you mean?

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  4. 9:28-
    So I guess Coach Colbert (KSC), Coach Schienman (formerly at PSU) & Coach Rowe (Endicott) should not be coaching in college let alone high school.
    Colbert & Schienman didn't even play high school basketball & none of them played in college.
    All are proven winners at the college level.
    I bet you wished your kid could play for them.
    There are tons of great coaches out there who never played in college worked their buts off to become a coach, instead of being the hometown hero and returning to their stomping ground to coach and living off their glory days!!!!!!

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  5. Just because you played a high school sport does not mean you can coach....Not all former players make out to be good coaches.....Coaches are a bread of their own.

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  6. What was Stevens to do ? This late in the process there weren't many qualified people out there,because they waited so long Stevens was unable to enter a summer league.
    Losing there best player will hurt, but not playing this summer hurts even more. If O'Connor would have stayed so would have the coach, maybe its better to start the rebuilding a year early.

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  7. news flash...there aren't more then one handful of "next level" coach's from NH...trust me, there are plenty of excellent coach's in NH who A: know the game, B: are great role models for you kid, C:tend to know the reality of your kids talent level relative to others...ie won't overestimate how far they can go...not every coach in every class in qualified to be there, but I wouldn't hesitate to let my son/daughter play for a vast majority of NH HS coach's.

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  8. 9:28...for real??? What you fail to realize is that 99.7% of all Nh high school hoop players END their careers at 18 yr old. They learn things like discipline, teamwork, how to overcome obsticles, how to deal with success and failures...if you're a Matt Bonner or Jordan Laguierre, yes i can see your point about wanting to a coach who has experienced what they are about to...but to say that the people coaching in high school now other than a select 2-3 guys shouldn't be there is ridiculous...

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  9. Well I Guess we established 9:28 didn't meant it. Or realized he misspoke.

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  10. Rick Majerus - never played college basketball
    Jeff Van Gundy - never played college basketball
    Stan Van Gundy - never played college basketball
    Bill Herrion - never played college basketball

    Just to name a few. There's plenty more. These guys all coach or coached either in the NBA or Division I college basketball. And they never played college ball. So you do you honestly think it makes sense to say that you aren't qualified to coach HIGH SCHOOL basketball unless you played in college? I didn't think so.

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  11. Who has the most titles and how many of these guys played in the NBA do you know or should i help you with that one?
    11 Phil Jackson Chicago Bulls 1990-91, 1991-92, 1992-93, 1995-96, 1996-97, 1997-98
    L.A. Lakers 1999-00, 2000-01, 2001-02, 2008-09, 2009-10
    9 Red Auerbach Boston Celtics 1956-57, 1958-59, 1959-60, 1960-61, 1961-62, 1962-63 1963-64, 1964-65, 1965-66
    5 Pat Riley L.A. Lakers 1981-82, 1984-85, 1986-87 1987-88
    Miami Heat 2005-06
    5 John Kundla Minneapolis Lakers
    (now L.A. Lakers) 1948-49, 1949-50, 1951-52, 1952-53, 1953-54
    4 Gregg Popovich San Antonio Spurs 1998-99, 2002-03, 2004-05, 2006-07
    2 Bill Russell Boston Celtics 1967-68, 1968-69
    2 Red Holzman New York Knicks 1969-70, 1972-73
    2 Tom Heinsohn Boston Celtics 1973-74, 1975-76
    2 K. C. Jones Boston Celtics 1983-84, 1985-86
    2 Chuck Daly Detroit Pistons 1988-89, 1989-90
    2 Rudy Tomjanovich Houston Rockets 1993-94, 1994-95
    2 Alex Hannum

    Here is your baseball let me know which ones did not play in the Majors
    1.


    Connie Mack


    3,731

    2.


    John McGraw


    2,763

    3.


    Tony LaRussa


    2,297

    4.


    Sparky Anderson


    2,194

    5.


    Bobby Cox


    2,171

    6.


    Bucky Harris


    2,157

    7.


    Joe McCarthy


    2,125

    8.


    Walter Alston


    2,040

    9.


    Leo Durocher


    2,008

    10.


    Joe Torre


    1,973

    11.


    Casey Stengel


    1,905

    12.


    Gene Mauch


    1,902

    13.


    Bill McKechnie


    1,896

    14.


    Ralph Houk


    1,619

    15.


    Fred Clarke


    1,602

    16.


    Tom Lasorda


    1,599

    17.


    Dick Williams


    1,571

    18.


    Lou Piniella


    1,519

    19.


    Clark Griffith


    1,491

    20.


    Earl Weaver


    1,480

    21.


    Miller Huggins


    1,413

    22.


    Al Lopez


    1,410

    23.


    Jimmy Dykes


    1,406

    24.


    Wilbert Robinson


    1,399

    25.


    Chuck Tanner


    1,352
    Here is football let me know.

    Paul Brown As player:

    * Ohio State University (1941–1943)
    * Cleveland Browns (1946–1962)
    * Cincinnati Bengals (1968–1975)

    Career highlights and awards

    * 1 NCAA National Championship (1942)
    * 4 AAFC Championships (1946–1949)
    * 3 NFL Championships (1950, 1954–1955)
    * 3× Sporting News Coach of the Year (1949, 1951, 1953)
    * 3× UPI NFL Coach of the Year (1957, 1969, 1970)
    * Paul Brown Stadium named after him
    * Paul Brown Tiger Stadium named after him
    * 213–104–9 (regular season record)
    * 9–8 (playoff record)
    * 222-112–9 (overall record)
    Then there was this guy named Don Shula
    No. 96, 44, 25, 26
    Head Coach
    Cornerback
    Personal information
    Date of birth: January 4, 1930 (1930-01-04) (age 80)
    Grand River, Ohio

    Career information
    College: John Carroll
    NFL Draft: 1951 / Round: 9 / Pick: 110
    Debuted in 1951 for the Cleveland Browns
    Last played in 1957 for the Washington Redskins
    Made coaching debut in 1960 for the Detroit Lions
    Last coached in 1995 for the Miami Dolphins
    Career history
    As player:

    * Cleveland Browns (1951-1952)
    * Baltimore Colts (1953-1956)
    * Washington Redskins (1957)

    As coach:

    * Detroit Lions (1960-1962)
    (Defensive coordinator)
    * Baltimore Colts (1963-1969)
    (Head coach)
    * Miami Dolphins (1970-1995)
    (Head coach)

    Career highlights and awards

    * 2× Super Bowl champion (VII, VIII)
    * 5× AFC Championship winner (1971, 1972, 1973, 1982, 1984)
    * 1× NFL Championship winner (1968)
    * 11× Division title winner
    * Most regular-season wins (328)
    * Most Super Bowl appearance as Head coach (6)
    * 328–156–6 (Regular season)
    * 19–17 (Post season)
    * 347–173–6 (Overall)
    * 4 time NFL Coach of the Year
    * NFL 1970s All-Decade Team
    Hockey anyone? you get the picture yet the best out there are the ones that have gone through the real thing period!!!

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  12. 95% of parents who post on these blogs have no clue about what makes a good coach to begin with. All they know is some coach somewhere did not evaluate their kids abilities with the same set of rose-colored glasses they wear.

    There are examples of of people who played a sport well beyond HS and became great coaches and those who played their last game as 18 yr olds and still became great coaches. There are also many legends of sport who were not sucessful as coaches/managers. Ted Williams managed 4 years with a combined record of 273-364. He last season his team lost 100 games.

    There is no one magic formula that works, good coaches come from all kinds of background experiences.

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  13. I know look at Magie from Wildcats. She was a single mom with two girls and she never played football. She was the best coach in Chicago.

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  14. He was not a Captain of the Championship Team, but he was in the Movie Gummo.

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  15. Captain on the team that Beat Brady with Collins Yeatton Moulas

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  16. ok 2:28...I'll let you know when Coach K wants to apply for the next local NH job...and if he gets hired I guess you'll have a place for your son to play.

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  17. 2:28 very interesting all the info about professionals, but lets get back to the high school sport!

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  18. The problem is so many people who post on these blogs treat high school athletics as if it were on a scale higher than professsional sports.

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  19. Funny that somebody can respect "Lapochello", but just not enough to spell his name correctly (Lavolpicelo).

    So I also guess if your son/daughter played for Keno Davis at Providence (who won the 2008 AP Coach of the Year) you wouldn't respect him?

    Or Bruce Pearl of Tennesee?
    Or Tom Crean of Indiana?
    Or Mark Few of Gonzaga?
    Or Bruce Weber of Illinois?

    http://sports.espn.go.com/ncb/columns/story?columnist=katz_andy&id=3045864

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  20. Lavolpicelo hasn't proven a thing in the coaching world yet.And even if he does, not everyone gets the chance to play for Alosa. If you are going to rip someone than sign your name to it. Don't hide behind an anonymous internet post. Quit hiding behind your Houde.

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  21. Lavolpicelo hasn't proven a thing in the coaching world yet.And even if he does, not everyone gets the chance to play for Alosa. If you are going to rip someone than sign your name to it.


    Hmmm, practice what you preach!

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  22. For eveyone who is being critical, every single 'great coach' named above in this thread had to actually start somewhere with a career record of 0-0. Somewhere, someone had to take a chance and give them the opportunity to become what they are today.

    Even Coach K had it rough early in his coaching career. He was hired at Army after being an assistant at Indiana for just one season. His first year at Army was 11-14. He got the Duke job after 6 years at West Point with a combined record of 73-59, including a final year of 9-17. His first three years at Duke were a combined 38-47.

    There was absolutely no reason to think he was going to take his team to 26 NCAA Tournaments in 27 years, including 11 Final Fours, and 4 NCAA tournament National Championships. Before that incredible streak started, his career record was a mere 111-106.

    Every coach (even the best ever) needs to be given the chance to fail & learn. I am sure that parents of the kids in the very early 80's did not care that Coach Krzyzewski had played for Bobby Knight at Army. All they saw was a guy whose overall coaching record was barely over .500. Just imagine what the Duke basketball program would be like today if the school had decided to listen to those who were complaining back then that Krzyzewski would never become a great coach. After all, he was a former player and had only one 20 win season in 8 years as a head coach. Duke had only won 13 games in the ACC in his first 3 years and finished no higher than 5th in the ultra-competitive conference. It certainly sucked for those kids who graduated in 1983 watching North Carolina and NC State winning the National Title in '82 & '83 respectively.

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  23. Why are we talking about this coach not being qualified because he did not play college ball when He did play college ball?

    Ironically he may not be qualified because he has little coaching experience.

    Probably a better question is why did there two best players leave, the head coach, and the JV coach?

    That I would love to hear the answer to.

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  24. We are talking high school coaches here, not college. What is the budget that Steven's has to pay this individual...probably not a lot. Will he even make $5K for the long hours he will put in with the team? Give the coach a break and I commend him for taking the position.

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  25. You have to get experience somewhere, so why not at Stevens. He comes from a good program, Keith Matte is one of the best coach's in the state. Always has a playoff team, runs a great system and I would think this coach will do the same.
    You look at all the great college coach's, they had to start somewhere. So cut the guy some slack.

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  26. "Captain on the team that Beat Brady with Collins Yeatton Moulas" Not true, but he was in Gummo, that's a fact.

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  27. The discussion point has NOTHING to do with $$$. No one in NH is coaching high school sports for the bucks.

    The point is EVERY coach must have a first hrad coaching job, whether he has previous experience playing that sport or not. It does not matter what level theyare at or how great they become over time.

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  28. Scott will do a great job. He knows the game.

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  29. How does one become a head coach if you can only hire a head coach with head coaching experience?

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  30. Ask and you shall receive! Kaleb is my son and he left Stevens for 2 reasons, basketball being one. The more important is the educational experience he is having at St. Marks school. I believe he will be tremendously prepared for the college experience due to the academic requirements at St. Marks as well as the necessary time management skills required to be successful there.

    I don't wish to speak for O'Connors, but I am sure that these very issues were pertinent to their decision.

    I cannot comment on coach McIvers decision, but I do know that coach Dougher accepted the JV coaching position under coach Ladue in Windsor, Vt before coach McIvers decision. I applaud coach Doughers decision, as Windsor has been very successful over the years, and he will be well served under the tutteledge of coach Ladue.

    As a citizen and taxpayer of Claremont I applaud coach MacNamee for dedicating his time and efforts to the youth of our program. We all should bear in mind that high school coaches certainly are not in it for the money.

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  31. Leaving Stevens for academics no one can question. But the coaches??

    Choosing the jv job at Windsor over the varsity of Stevens?

    Coach Mcciver is just getting it going there and then steps down??


    There's more?

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  32. (McIver)Hes coached for a longg time now hes getting older and wants to spend more time with family. And they should allready be considered a contender a couple kids didnt play last year that are playing this year. Four starters are back along with the best jv squad last year. Oconnor is a great offensive threat but none on deffense, all of kids his size had their way with him. Especially arsunalt in the playoffs.

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  33. Coach McIver had been coaching for almost 20 years at different levels, he was one of Mark Dunhams coach's at Plymouth. He told many people that this was his last "go round" and he was gonna retire when Kaleb and O'Connor gaduated.First Kaleb left then O'Connor and he felt it was time to go also.
    As for the reasons why Kevin O'Connor left Stevens , after speaking with his father, he left Stevens for St. Pauls for the education. Like many good high school players, he was approached by a few other prep schools and they wanted him purely for basketball.
    At St. Puals they didn't ask about his points per game but his GPA. As his father told me, " one day basketball will end, but education will stay with him the rest of his life"
    These are words that parents of good players who are thinking about going to prep school should realize. Its not about getting a free ride to college, its about going to college and being able to succeed.
    For both Kevin and Kaleb going to prep school is the first step in furthering their education as well as improving their basketball skills.

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  34. O'connor never covered Arsunalt, Stevens played man to man and that was never his man to cover, so before you diss a player, know the facts.
    Arsunalt is a good player that uses his body very well, he slashes to the basket and gets up a shot in a crowd, but to expect any player to block the ball everytime is assine.
    I saw O'connor play 5 times this year, 2 against Mascoma, 2 against Conant and 1 against Berlin. At those games he was the leading scorer and kept the man he was guarding below his coring average. Can he improve his defense ? Of course he can , as can almost all High school players where playing defense is not as important to coach's as scoring.
    If these kids had nothing to work on to improve their game they would be playing pro right now, which they are not, so ease up on these players, they have a long way to go till they are perfect.

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  35. Why wouldn't that be his man? Who else on Stevens is considered as good a defender? That seems strange

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  36. With all due respect if Kaleb wasn't a basketball player you would not even know where St Mark's was located.

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  37. Ocoonor was arsunault FIRST HALF HE had 13, second half a kid named cam blewitt gaurded him he scored 5....

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  38. The kid from mascoma scored 18 against him second time, jimmy peard 18? Hmm under their average? I think not. i heard hes training though getting bigger faster. Kudos to him taking advantage of his opportunity.

    11:14 your wrong he did, and did a bad job, no question though hes the best in class M ill take him over jimmy, sean, newman, or curtis.

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  39. What is a Houde?????? how do you hide behind it?

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  40. A Houde is a person who lives Newport but went to Stevens

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  41. A houde is a person who grew up in Claremont but then moves to Newport

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  42. Going back over newspaper accounts of the Stevens/Berlin game its says that Stevens played a zone in the first half and then went to a man to man defense in the second half.
    Arsunlt finished the game with 18 while O'Connor had 25.
    The 2 Conant games, O'Connor had 23 both times while Peard had 16 and 18. The 2 Mascoma games O'Connor had 23 and 21 while Torrey had 14 and 19.
    Not sure whether O'Connor guarded those players the entire game but those are the players that play his position. Not sure how well he plays defense , but if you can out score the man you are guarding, that seems pretty good to me.

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  43. That actually means very little shooting percentage and team play are the bigger components to winning and effectiveness. I mean if Kobe shoots 40% from the floor and has 30 points at the end of three then doesnt show up in the fourth qtr and Michael Jordan keeps his team involved for three quarters has 15 at the end of three and then scores 15 in the final quarter and his team wins who played better? You can never just look at the numbers to see who won the battle, it is a little more complicated than that.

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  44. A. Houde is a 13yr. old Baseball Player....How does the basketball coach hide behind that In Newport??? He has allways lived there. Not Claremont... he'll end up at a school like Pembroke or Proctor......average hoop player.

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  45. Lavolpicelo will be Fine. With or without Houde. High School, Coach Brown then play 6 yrs as a Raider at the same time!!!!!! 4 yr schollership player, 2k in high school.....If he stayes I believe houde stays. Houde could score 2,500pts.in Class "M". then look out. Coronis isn't leaveing.. Houde is unperdictable.... Good and Big with lots of skills in multy Athletic Areana's....Plays AAU baseball in Ny.Lets hope he stays. Accidemics is a hugh issue in Sullivan County..Thats why we lose the best in Sul. County.Example Kevin ,Kalab. Lavolpicelo Will Win. Didn'tValolpicelo Apply for the Stevens job??? We what our kids to have the same Accidemics as the rest of the state. We all got our underachiving letters last week. Support the local Athletes so they do Stay in County Insead of haveing to leave because our school do not prepare for the Student Athletes Hardships after High School.."Lets enjoy the apple that didn't fall fare from the tree"..

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  46. Back to Wed July 14 9:28

    There is a great saying in the world of coaching that you should consider. "I've seen coaches that can't play...and players that can't coach". Nothing could be more true.

    Lou Holtz was the equipment manager on his HS football team and took the most storied college football team in America to a national title. I haven't seen a more dominant basketball player than Magic Johnson, and he lasted 11 games as the lakers coach before quitting (remember the Nick van Exel pager smashing incident)...he couldn't coach.

    Coaching has more to do with motivation and psychology than playing experience. Anyone can learn the X's and O's and what to do in game situations, but can you elevate a group of players motivation in order to acheive things they never before thought possible? That is coaching and it doesn't take an ex player to do that.

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  47. I Agree, x's and o's are 1/10th of what beiing a coach is all about....

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  48. A Houde is already a household name, anything but average!

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  49. I thought this was about coach mac?

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  50. in High school, it is 95% about coaching fundamental and understanding X's & O's. Motivating is a minimal component, especially if you do not have the fundamentals.

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  51. Look at Phil Jackson he wasn't a good pro, but was on a good pro team with a good pro coach.

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  52. Who said Phil wasn't a good pro? He was not a all star but if you make it to the NBA you are definitely experienced enough to coach. And lets be honest it isn't like he was a NBA coach first he had to work his way up from the CBA or ABA or one of those.

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  53. Motivating is a "minimal component"??!!?? How many times have you seen teams with talent crumble at the end of a season or not play well in a game they should win because they were not directed (or motivated) to play as a unit and do what is necessary to win. Why would you want to play for a coach that doesn't inspire you to be your best, and who doesn't motivate you to play the role that will help the team win? Attitude overcomes any skill deficiency, and I'd rather play for someone who has motivated me enough to run through a brick wall to get better and be a champion than someone who knows the X's and O's but can't motivate.

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  54. How many times have you seen teams with talent crumble at the end of a season or not play well in a game they should win because they were not directed (or motivated) to play as a unit and do what is necessary to win.

    LOL, usually it is because they are NOT as good as parents and supporters think!

    We are not talking about a college team playing 35 to 40 games or a pro playing over 80 here. These are high school kids playing 18 games maybe another 2 or 3 over the Xmas break and a game or two into the tournament if they are fortunate.

    Losses in high school are due to lack of talent or inability to execute, not a lack of motivation. You can motivate all week long, but if you fail to execute in the game, being motivated does not mean anything.

    "Attitude overcomes any skill deficiency"

    LOL, are you insane? Yeah, attitude turns a 6'1" player into a real threat to a Zach Mathieu. Attitude really helps you if your a slow footed defender guarding a Mike Mitchell or an Alex Burt. Motivation does you a lot of good if you have horrible shooting fundamentals. In what universe does attitude and motivation overcome "skill deficiency? Upsets come when talented teams rise above their talent. Without talent, there are no upsets or so-called great "motivational" moments.

    Phil Jackson is considered to be the master motivator, yet how many NBA titles did he win without having the best talent? Being the great motivator did not help him much in '93-94 or 94-95 without M. Jordan. Bring Jordan back...and wow...3 more titles...after the 3 in a row with Shaq/Kobe, injuries and a rebuilding put LA down...Motivation yielded no titles until Gasol got tough and and Andrew Bynum gave LA a superior inside game to compliment Bryant. TALENT, not a motivational speaker has won the last 2 NBA titles!

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  55. Give me a break Phil Jackson was not a good pro, he was lucky to be on a very good pro team. Just because he made it to the pro's doesn't mean he was a good pro.
    Of course he worked his way up and being on that good team with a good coach like Red helped.

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  56. Phil Jackson
    "While he was a good all-around athlete, with unusually long arms, he was limited offensively and compensated with intelligence and hard work on defense."I
    "In the 1974-75 NBA season, Jackson and the Milwaukee Bucks' Bob Dandridge shared the lead for total personal fouls, with 330 each."

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  57. The argument wasn't about player talent...The argument was does a good coach have to have been a player and the answer is NO because there are so many things that a great coach brings to the table that do not necessarily correlate with being a player at a high level. We weren't talking about player talent.

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  58. There were several comments about a player's success at the high level.
    "here is a great saying in the world of coaching that you should consider. "I've seen coaches that can't play...and players that can't coach". Nothing could be more true."

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  59. So you didn't read 2:28's post?

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  60. Give me a break Phil Jackson was not a good pro, he was lucky to be on a very good pro team.

    He was the 17th overall pick in 1967 NBA draft.
    5:21 - you omitted some info from your Wikipedia cut & paste....

    "Jackson eventually established himself as a fan favorite and one of the NBA's leading substitutes. He was a top reserve on the Knicks team that won the NBA title in 1973. "

    5:13 - Do your research instead of popping off with a baseless opinion.

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  61. Plenty of examples of coaches who did not [play who have been successful as well. If beng a great player is such a pre-qualifier, why did't Bird or Magic ever win a title as a coach? Why hasn't Jordan become a coach? or Kareem, or Dr J?

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  62. At the time Jackson was one of the top 150 players in the world. There were what about 8 NBA teams? So he had to be good enough to teach the game at that time. Would I want him teaching my son mechanics on his jumper now,maybe not but then he was more than just a good player he was a NBA player.

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  63. Is this about NH class m Basketball, Wow!!! Thats why Qualifidy Coach's are hard to find..10:25 " Baseless opinions"

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  64. He became seriously interested in coaching during the Knick's 1970 title season which he had to sit out due to back-fusion surgery. He had that whole year to learn coaching from Red Holtzman.

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  65. 4:59 what are you talking about? No one denies that player talent helps a team win...that wasn't even close to what i was talking about. The discussion was that high level play is not necessarily a factor in successful coaching, therefore the quote "I've seen coaches that cant play, and players that can't coach" Your post is incoherent, but loosely addresses something entirely different.

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  66. 10:58,

    I was responding to 4:12. It has nothing to with your quote.

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  67. Wrong again...you addressed my post directly and my post was about coaching and what it takes to be a good one, not player talent

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  68. 9:58 & 9:07
    Opps!! guess you better read more carefully before pointing the finger!

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  69. so the 4:12 post is yours too? The 4:12 post was about motivation not your deeply profound quote. The subject was about HS coaching. Good HS coaches have to do much more with teaching fundamentals and Xs & Os than they do "motivating". Go ask a few. You may learn something about how many hours a week they spend teaching fundamentals and working out the Xs & Os of the next game Vs "Motivation".

    Another thing you might spend some learning time on is watching a few 8th grade teams in various town. You will find very few fundamentally sound players at that age, especially among your future bigs.

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  70. I,m not sure what 8th grade bigs you think are unskilled but I Saw some very skill teams in the 25th Bow Junior High Tourney. 17-0 laconia was big, Jaffry/Ringe was very good. Couple of Claremont,and Newport kids, One of them made the All tourney.Epsom had a Nice Big. All tourny. I think there will be some Fine talent coming in for the next 10yrs. with some young new coaches in the towns most don't count for Fundamentaly sound bigs or even players.

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  71. I am glad for those teams that they may have talent movin gup the ladder. I am talking about the state as a whole though. Not just a few teams that went to one tournament. What about Farmington, Epping, Sanborn, Kennett Lebanon, Hanover, Monadnock, Concord, Goffstown, Plymouth, Keene, Dover, Rochester, etc.

    Also teams like St. Thomas, Portsmouth Christian Academy and others who do not have a real middle school feeder program must take what ever they get and work those kids into their programs.

    In general, most kids moving from middle school into high school have fundamental flaws that need to be corrected. Everything from bigs who do not yet understand proper positioning and boxout techniques to players with basic shooting and ball handling flaws.

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  72. I agree 10;30 Young Athletes with size have a great advatage with Fundementals. Not many Middle School Coachs have the time or knowledge to give them what they need Flaw in the School systems. 6 min. quarters.Please, kids Sink or play AAU starting at 10yrs. Old. If you want to have a chance to have fundametals at 13-14..

    9:43

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  73. 7:53 here we go again - if you are a HS varsity coach and you have to spend (as you say) a majority of your time "coaching fundamentals" then your team isnt going to win any games, period. Any varsity rotation player should have a solid grasp of "fundamentals before he even gets to you! So you are going to make a team that isnt fundamentally sound good at fundamentals in the 3 weeks that you have before the games start - what a joke!! Successful HS varsity coaches certainly practice their players, implement offensive and defensive strategies, but also clearly use additional strategies with regards to individual and team motivation and goal setting to bring the various members of a team together towards a common accomplishment - most notably the roles they each must accept in order to win a championship. Maybe that's why they don't win much where you live - the varsity coach is doing lay up lines and dribble knockout to build fundamentals.

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  74. 10:25
    So he was the overall 17th pick. Doesn't mean he was a good pro. A lot of guys are picked high in the draft and don’t become good pros.

    He was a fan favorite, so, doesn't mean he was a good pro! Hank Finkel was a fan favorite, doesn't mean he was a great pro!

    He was a top reserve because he was surrounded by very good/great teammates.

    You omitted: “Soon after the 1973 title, several key starters retired, creating an opening for Jackson in the starting lineup”. That’s he how he became a starter after all the greats retired. Practice what you preach 10:25.

    10:25 this whole blog is a person’s opinion.

    He will end up in the HOF for coaching, not as a player.

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  75. And thats it for inside the NBA. todays profile is P. Jack... Like all pro"s GOOD.Coaches need players Hence M.J. Take 6 away without MJ Without MJ you don't get too coach the lakers for 4-5more titles, Players make it easy to coach.. Like this Class "M" new coach or coaches???? Best players win game, Not the star allinment.

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  76. I can't believe this discussion has gotten down to Phil Jackson and his 17th draft position. It's safe to assume he must have been a pretty good player to be drafted that high, tell me the last NH player to get drafted that high . Jackson paid his dues long before going to the Bulls, he was an assistant for the Nets for years as well as coaching in the CBA.
    In high school its great to have a coach with Matt Alosa's experience, but thats rare. Usually all you get is what Stevens is getting, someone that played high school and maybe a little college ball.
    So get over yourselves and realize this is a "cowtown" state and play the game for the love of the game.

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  77. So get over yourselves and realize this is a "cowtown" state and play the game for the love of the game.



    SO TRUE!

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  78. 8:01
    Yes I did see him play many times in Madison Square Garden, in person not TV. Did you?

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  79. 8:02,

    I never said he was a "great player". Someone said he was not a good pro - that assumption is absurd and not backed up by the facts. Are you even old enough to remember seeing him play? Talk to few of the old Celtics and ask them about him.
    I never said he should be a HOFer for his playing days.

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  80. Congratulations coach MacNamee!

    Good luck to Coach McIver who I only saw coach about a dozen games but always thought he ran a classy program.

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  81. Coach Mac, Best wishes.

    Claremont can be a tough town, but Lebanon is no different.

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  82. Class M is filled with players who lack basic fundamentals. Class M has produced maybe 5 good college basketball players over the past decade. I mean what class M players have gone on to have productive college careers. Lets not talk like X and O's arent huge in Class M cuz they are. With players of lower talent the coaching become more important. Why do you think 90% of all Class M teams run mainly sets on offense and not a continuity. The classes talent level has fallen off since the start of the 2000s with the best players not staying (Kaleb) and some of the best schools changing classes (Bow, Pelham).

    I would like to know who else applied for this job if anyone knows.

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  83. I doubt many people were very intrigued to take this program over if a guy with a year worth or Freshman basketball coaching got the job. Why also is the job still up on the NHIAA bulletin board. Oh I see the Stevens High School slipping back to the bottom of the bottom.

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